Yahoo (International News)

· Gaza toll soars as Israel 'days' from completing tunnel hunt

Palestinians mourn outside a morgue in Gaza CityBy Nidal al-Mughrabi and Dan Williams GAZA/JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel pressed ahead with its Gaza offensive saying it was days from achieving its core goal of destroying all Islamist guerrilla cross-border attack tunnels, but a soaring Palestinian civilian toll has triggered international alarm. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's security cabinet on Wednesday approved continuing the assault launched on July 8 in response to a surge of rocket attacks by Gaza's dominant Hamas Islamists. ...


· Moscow fights back after sanctions; battle rages near Ukraine crash site

A woman takes a photograph of wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Hrabove (Grabovo)By Polina Devitt and Gabriela Baczynska MOSCOW/KIEV (Reuters) - Russia fought back on Wednesday over new U.S. and EU sanctions imposed over Ukraine even as G7 leaders warned of further steps, while Ukraine's government accused pro-Russian rebels of placing land mines near the site of a crashed Malaysian airliner to prevent a proper investigation. Russia announced a ban on most fruit and vegetable imports from Poland and said it could extend it to the entire European Union, a move Warsaw called Kremlin retaliation for new Western sanctions over Ukraine imposed on Russia on Tuesday. ...


· Temporary ceasefire in Tripoli, 75 bodies found in Benghazi

A general view shows fire burning at a fuel depot near the airport road in TripoliBy Aziz El Yaakoubi and Ayman Al-Warfalli BENGHAZI/TRIPOLI (Reuters) - Rival Libyan militias fighting for control of Tripoli's airport agreed to a temporary ceasefire on Wednesday to allow firefighters to try to control a huge blaze at a fuel depot hit by a rocket. Meanwhile in Libya's second city, Benghazi, at least 75 bodies, mostly soldiers, were found after two days of fighting in which Islamist fighters and allied militiamen overran an army base. The past two weeks of fighting have been the worst since the civil war that ousted Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, prompting Western governments to follow the United States and the United Nations in pulling their diplomats out of the North African country.


· Hezbollah commander killed in Iraq: sources
A Hezbollah commander has died during a mission in Iraq, sources familiar with the incident said on Wednesday, indicating the Lebanese group that is already fighting in Syria's civil war may be involved in a second conflict in the region. Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed Shi'ite Islamist group, has not previously announced any role in the conflict in Iraq, which escalated last month when radical Sunni militants seized large areas of territory from the Shi'ite-led government in Baghdad. Four sources in Lebanon named the Hezbollah commander as Ibrahim al-Haj, a technical specialist involved in training. They said he was "martyred" in a battle near Mosul, a city in northern Iraq seized from government control last month by an al Qaeda offshoot known as the Islamic State.
· U.S. blacklists North Korea shipping firms over arms shipments
The United States on Wednesday blacklisted two North Korean shipping firms that it said tried to conceal arms shipments from Cuba to North Korea, following a similar move by the United Nations. The ship, Chong Chon Gang, was discovered last July near the Panama Canal hiding a large amount of arms, including two MiG-21 jet fighters under 200,000 bags of sugar, which the United States said showed a clear attempt to circumvent U.N. and U.S. sanctions against North Korea. North Korea is under an array of sanctions for nuclear and ballistic missile tests since 2006 in defiance of global demands to stop. "The Chong Chon Gang episode, in which (North Korea) tried to hide an arms shipment under tons of sugar, is a perfect example of North Korea's deceptive activity, and precisely the sort of conduct that we are committed to disrupting," David Cohen, the U.S. Treasury Department's undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, said in a statement.
· Army breaks up protests as Yemen raises fuel prices

A demonstrator blocks a street with burning tyres during a protest against fuel price hikes in SanaaOne woman was killed in protests that erupted in Sanaa on Wednesday after the Yemeni government announced a rise in fuel prices. The government increased fuel prices after spending about $3 billion on energy subsidies last year, nearly a third of state revenue. Yemen has been trying for over a year to secure a loan of at least $560 million from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) but the fund is pressing for subsidies to be slashed. Yemen's finance minister told Reuters in May that the Fund's board was expected to finalize the deal this month.


· Landslide buries Indian village; at least 24 dead

Rescue workers carry the body of a victim at the site of a landslide in Malin village, in the western Indian state of Maharashtra, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. Torrential rains triggered a massive landslide that buried a remote village in western India on Wednesday, killing more than a dozen people as it swept away scores of houses and possibly trapping many more people under debris, officials said. (AP Photo)MALIN, India (AP) — Rescue workers and desperate villagers dug through deep mud, rocks and the debris of shattered homes Thursday after a massive landslide buried a remote village in western India, killing at least 24 people and trapping more than 150, authorities said.


· Top Asian News at 5:00 a.m. GMT
MALIN, India (AP) — Rescue workers and desperate villagers dug through deep mud, rocks and the debris of shattered homes Thursday after a massive landslide buried a remote village in western India, killing at least 24 people and trapping more than 150, authorities said. Two days of torrential rains triggered the landslide early Wednesday, but national rescue personnel could not reach the stricken area in Pune district of Maharashtra state for several hours because of bad roads and debris. Rain was still hampering the effort by Thursday morning.
· Deaths in shelling of Gaza market, school enrage UN

Palestinian paramedics move a victim of an Israeli air strike on a market to an ambulance in the Shejaiya neighbourhood near Gaza City on July 30, 2014More than 100 Palestinians were killed in the bomb-scarred Gaza Strip, among them victims of Israeli fire on a crowded market and a United Nations school. The United States and United Nations condemned the school shelling and Hamas said it fired a salvo of rockets into Israel in retaliation for both attacks. At least 17 people were killed in the strike on the market in Shejaiya, near Gaza City, as Israel observed a four-hour humanitarian lull in other parts of the crowded coastal strip.


· Serena Williams wins in her return

Serena Williams returns the ball during the second set of her match against Karolina Pliskova in the Bank of the West Classic Tennis Tournament, Wednesday, July 30, 2014, in Stanford, Calif. (AP Photo/Beck Diefenbach)STANFORD, California (AP) — Top-ranked Serena Williams won in her first match since defaulting in a doubles match with sister Venus at Wimbledon, beating Karolina Pliskova 7-5, 6-2 on Wednesday in the second round of the Bank of the West Classic.


· Sydney FC signs Austria's Janko as marquee recruit
SYDNEY (AP) — Sydney FC has hired Austria striker Marc Janko as its marquee player for the 2014-15 A-League season to replace Alessandro del Piero, the Juventus great who left the club at the end last season.
· Argentina slides into default as debt talks fail

An activist holds a banner that reads in Spanish "Homeland or vultures, be strong Argentina", during a demonstration in support of the government in their dispute over $1.5 billion with a U.S. hedge fund, known locally as "vulture funds", in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. Argentina's economy minister leads a last-gasp effort Wednesday to strike a deal with U.S. creditors that would prevent the South American country from slipping into default. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)NEW YORK (AP) — The collapse of talks with U.S. creditors sent Argentina into its second debt default in 13 years and raised questions about what comes next for financial markets and the South American nation's staggering economy.


· Asian markets drift after US Fed stays course

Trader James Dresch, right, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, June 30, 2014. European stocks were lower Wednesday July 30, 2014 ahead of U.S. economic data while cheery earnings from major Japanese companies such as Honda Motor Co. boosted Asian markets.(AP Photo/Richard Drew)MUMBAI, India (AP) — Asian stock markets were uninspired by an upbeat report on the U.S. economy, with most drifting lower Thursday after the U.S. Federal Reserve said it would make further cuts to its monetary stimulus as expected.


· Top Asian News at 4:30 a.m. GMT
NEW DELHI (AP) — Rescuers worked in rain Thursday to dig through a remote village in western India where at least 21 people died as a landslide swept away scores of houses, possibly trapping many more people under debris, officials said. They had already worked through the night using floodlights mounted on jeeps and earthmoving vehicles to pull seven injured people out of the mud and twisted wreckage, Vitthal Banot, a disaster management official, said Thursday. They were taken to a nearby government-run hospital, but their injuries were not life threatening.
· First lady asks leaders to change gender attitudes

First lady Michelle Obama speaks to selected participants of the Presidential Summit for the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders in Washington, Wednesday, July 30, 2014, during a roundtable discussion. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)WASHINGTON (AP) — Michelle Obama called on young African leaders to change traditional attitudes and beliefs that harm girls and women, adding that educating and making women financially literate is not enough.


· Samsung profit falls as smartphone sales slow

FILE - In this July 8, 2014 file photo, a woman visits the Samsung Electronics Co.'s showroom in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung Electronics Co. reported lower-than-expected profit for the second quarter on Thursday, July 31, 2014 and said it was uncertain if handset business profit would improve during the current period. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Samsung Electronics Co. reported a bigger-than-expected fall in second quarter profit on Thursday and said it was uncertain if earnings from its handset business would improve in the current quarter.


· Despite concerns, US restocks Israel with ammunition

Members of Code Pink hold a vigil of civil disobedience and conduct a "die-in" in front of the Israeli Embassy July 30, 2014, protesting the deaths of Palestinians in GazaThe United States confirmed it had restocked Israel's supplies of ammunition, hours after finally sharpening its tone to condemn an attack on a United Nations school in Gaza. "Obviously nothing justifies the killing of innocent civilians seeking shelter in a UN facility," deputy State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf acknowledged, in some of the toughest US comments since the start of the 23-day fighting in the Gaza Strip.


· Wife of ex-Olympic champ Hooker banned for doping
SYDNEY (AP) — Ekaterina Kostetskaya , the wife of ex-World and Olympic pole vault champion Steve Hooker, is reportedly serving a two-year ban for a doping violation.
· Top Asian News at 4:00 a.m. GMT
NEW DELHI (AP) — Rescuers worked in rain Thursday to dig through a remote village in western India where at least 21 people died as a landslide swept away scores of houses, possibly trapping many more people under debris, officials said. They had already worked through the night using floodlights mounted on jeeps and earthmoving vehicles to pull seven injured people out of the mud and twisted wreckage, Vitthal Banot, a disaster management official, said Thursday. They were taken to a nearby government-run hospital, but their injuries were not life threatening.
· Australian leaders differ on Russian role in war

FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2013 file photo, Tony Abbott, left, talks with Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, right, after being sworn in as the 28th prime minister of Australia at Government House in Canberra. Abbott and Bishop on Thursday, July 31, 2014 sent mixed messages on whether Russia was frustrating Dutch and Australian police efforts to retrieve the bodies of victims of the Malaysian airliner disaster in war-torn east Ukraine. Bishop said she feared Russia was behind the daily artillery barrages blocking police, while Abbott said it was too early to judge. Abbott has declined to follow the U.S. and European examples by ratcheting up sanctions against Russia in a bid to pressure President Vladimir Putin into ending his country's support for the separatists. (AP Photo/Penny Bradfield, File)CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's prime minister and foreign minister on Thursday sent mixed messages on whether Russia was frustrating Dutch and Australian police efforts to retrieve the bodies of victims of the Malaysian airliner disaster in war-torn east Ukraine.



This service is provided by Worthy Christian News.