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Federal investigators have told Congress that they have recovered data that may include lost emails from one of the pivotal figures in the controversy over the Internal Revenue Service's treatment of tea party groups, congressional aides said Friday.
A House report on the 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, concludes that the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. military responded properly and that Obama administration "talking points" were flawed, but didn't find that administration officials attempted to mislead the public.
In its first examination of the limits of free speech on social media, the Supreme Court will consider next week the extent of free speech.
The most serious challenge to President Obama's health care law since it survived the Supreme Court by a single vote in 2012 isn't a balky website, public opinion or the Republican takeover of Congress. It's the Supreme Court -- again.
Multiple sources tell CBS News that the announcement of a grand jury decision in the Michael Brown shooting case is not expected before Monday.
Sheriffs around the country are planning to march on the nation's capital, hoping to send a message to President Obama and Congress that they oppose amnesty for illegal immigrants.
A bid to maintain South Carolina's man-woman marriage law ended Thursday when the Supreme Court declined to continue a stay blocking same-sex nuptials.
Several networks won't be carrying President Obama's prime-time address on immigration Thursday night from the White House.
Maryland's government recently instituted a "rain tax." The state has instructed the counties to tax landowners for the size of their roofs and paved services, because rainwater runs off of these impermeable surfaces and into the sewers. So you're responsible for the amount of rain you don't absorb.
China and at least one other country are capable of hacking into critical infrastructure such as the electric power grid or water systems, potentially causing "catastrophic failures" that could kill Americans or damage property, the head of the National Security Agency confirmed publicly for the first time Thursday.
Brushing aside Republican outrage, President Barack Obama is ordering far-reaching changes to the nation's immigration laws that will allow nearly 5 million people now here illegally to avoid deportation. The administration is also setting new enforcement priorities that could make it easier for many more to stay.
Demonstrations are planned in dozens of cities across the U.S. as a Missouri grand jury decides whether to indict a white police officer who killed an unarmed black teenager.
In a broad test of his executive powers, President Barack Obama declared Wednesday he will sidestep Congress and order his own federal action on immigration -- in measures that could spare from deportation as many as 5 million people illegally in the U.S. and set up one of the most pitched partisan confrontations of his presidency.
Gun dealers in parts of the St. Louis suburbs have reported brisk sales, especially among first-time buyers, as local residents wait for a grand jury decision on whether to indict the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot teenager Michael Brown this past August.
A crippling lake-effect snowstorm continues in parts of western New York, where up to 65 inches of snow has already fallen in the Buffalo suburbs, paralyzing travel.
President Obama is soon expected to use his executive power to change U.S. immigration policy. But don't expect him to stop there.
Senate Republicans rose to the defense of the NSA on Tuesday and filibustered a bill that would have halted the agency's phone-snooping program, saying it is more critical than ever amid advancing terrorism in the Middle East and fears of homegrown terrorism in the U.S.
The federal agency that insures pensions for about 41 million Americans saw its deficit nearly double in the latest fiscal year. The agency said the worsening finances of some multi-employer pension plans mainly caused the increased deficit.
President Obama has been unwavering and definitive in declaring he will not deploy U.S. ground troops into combat to fight ISIS militants. Period. However...
State officials allowed oil and gas companies to pump nearly three billion gallons of waste water into underground aquifers that could have been used for drinking water or irrigation.
Muslim groups have stepped up efforts to co-opt protests over the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., with a drive to equate the teen's death to the death of a radical Islamist shot during an FBI raid in 2009, a Washington-based security watchdog group is warning.
The U.S. Senate on Tuesday narrowly failed to pass a bill that would have approved construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, rejecting a measure the House of Representatives approved last week.
The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation's high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence.
A doctor from Sierra Leone who was being treated at a US hospital for Ebola has died, the Nebraska Medical Center said Monday.
Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., told reporters that she has enough votes to pass a bill to build the Keystone XL oil sands pipeline, which comes up for a vote Tuesday.
As the nation waits to hear whether a Missouri police officer will face charges for killing unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., the FBI is warning law enforcement agencies across the country that the decision "will likely" lead some extremist protesters to threaten and even attack police officers or federal agents.
Taxes are bad enough when you know they’re coming—and much worse when they arrive unexpectedly.
Pope Francis announced on Monday he would make his first visit to the United States next year, travelling to Philadelphia where he will celebrate an outdoor mass before an audience expected to number in the millions.
Both sides in the fight over same-sex marriage in South Carolina are waiting for a response from the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.
A surgeon who contracted the Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone died Monday at a Nebraska hospital where he was being treated in a biocontainment unit, the facility said in a statement.
With tensions running high, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon (D) on Monday issued an executive order activating the National Guard "to support law enforcement during any period of unrest" that might occur following a grand jury's decision in the fatal shooting death of an unarmed black teenager by a white police officer in Ferguson. Mo., in August.
The Washington National Cathedral hosted it first Muslim prayer service Friday afternoon in an effort to promote interfaith prayer and improved global relations between Muslims and Christians.
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is acknowledging he may have to consider recommendations to place ground forces in Iraq to help forces there locate targets if, in fact, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff makes that recommendation.
The U.S. Navy has deployed on a command ship in the Persian Gulf its first laser weapon capable of destroying a target.
An unexplained, polio-like illness has affected 75 children across the country, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives approved the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, but a similar measure struggled to get enough support in the Senate and President Barack Obama indicated he might use his veto if the bill does get through Congress.
A magnitude-4.8 earthquake Wednesday shook up parts of Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, the strongest of eight temblors that rattled the seismically active region over 24 hours.
The Justice Department is scooping up data from thousands of mobile phones through devices deployed on airplanes that mimic cellphone towers, a high-tech hunt for criminal suspects that is snagging a large number of innocent Americans, according to people familiar with the operations.
Never before has it been so easy to turn an idea into a business. With a simple Internet connection, some ingenuity and a lot of hard work, anyone today can create a new service or app or start selling products nationwide.
President Obama as soon as next week will announce executive action on immigration reform that would defer deportations for up to 5 million people living in the U.S. illegally.
For years, Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Jonathan Gruber was deemed an architect of Obamacare and his economic modeling was cited regularly by the health care law's defenders on Capitol Hill and in legal briefs defending the Affordable Care Act in federal courts.
President Obama's top military advisers revealed Thursday that the administration is rethinking whether to deploy combat ground troops in the fight against the Islamic State, as signs emerged that the terrorist group may be setting aside its differences and is working with al Qaeda's affiliate in Syria -- the Nusra Front -- to attack U.S.-backed rebels in the region.
President Obama is planning to unveil a 10-part plan for overhauling U.S. immigration policy via executive action -- including suspending deportations for millions -- as early as next Friday, a source close to the White House told Fox News.
Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, who rallied religious voters in a 2012 presidential nomination bid, this week signaled a possible run for president in 2016, but he can expect a GOP field far more crowded with social conservatives.
A procedural decision in a landmark Second Amendment case could spell the end for California laws restricting the issuance of permits to carry concealed handguns.
A conservative group that successfully pushed an Arizona school district to tamp down its sexual education curriculum has now filed suit in Colorado, accusing a high school of unlawfully blocking student efforts to gather together for prayer.
President Obama is "looking forward" to taking executive action on immigration, White House press secretary Josh Earnest said in an interview published Tuesday.
Washington National Cathedral is hosting a Muslim prayer service for the first time on Friday.
The National Retail Federation will try to prod Congress into passing a major Internet sales tax bill during the upcoming lame-duck session of Congress.
A U.S. Supreme justice on Monday temporarily blocked gay marriage in Kansas a day before it was due to go into effect.
Former CBS News investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson says CBS News executives kept a clip of President Obama refusing to call the Benghazi attacks terrorism secret until after the election in order to help Obama's re-election.
As the polar vortex gets displaced to the south, the door will open for arctic air to plunge over the most of the United States as the new week progresses.
Veterans Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald on Monday announced a complete restructuring in the wake of the scandal over excessive wait times and poor care that critics blamed for patient deaths.
Hackers recently broke into a U.S. Postal Service computer system and stole personal data, including Social Security numbers, for 750,000 employees and retirees, a U.S. official familiar with the breach told CNN on Monday.
The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law - a case that threatens subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.
A destructive "Trojan Horse" malware program has penetrated the software that runs much of the nation's critical infrastructure and is poised to cause an economic catastrophe, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
The ice man cometh. And does so early this year, after a former Pacific typhoon flew up toward the Arctic and rammed the jet stream.
A Federal appeals court panel in Ohio upheld four states' bans on gay marriage Thursday, setting the stage for the Supreme Court to rule finally on the constitutionality of same-sex marriage.
Now, President Barack Obama must limp into his final two years in office. All second-term presidents lose considerable clout at this mark. But Obama's time as a lame duck comes amid a political climate so fractured that compromise with Congress is all but impossible. And the Republican takeover of the Senate only further complicates his power to confront a confounding array of foreign and domestic policy challenges.
Voters in Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C. have voted to approve sweeping pro-marijuana legalization, according to a CNN projections.
The Justice Department has handed over to House investigators 64,280 pages of documents related to the notoriously botched Operation Fast and Furious -- data President Barack Obama had claimed was exempt from congressional review.
North Carolina state House Speaker Thom Tillis won the most expensive Senate race in U.S. history, eking out a victory Tuesday over Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan.
Pro-life initiatives stalled in both Colorado and North Dakota as measures to provide unborn children with human rights were handily rejected in both states.
Republicans stormed to victory Tuesday in US midterm elections, thumping rival Democrats to clinch control of both houses of Congress and assuring a fractious final two years of Barack Obama's presidency.
Republican businessman Larry Hogan scored a stunning upset in heavily Democratic Maryland on Tuesday, winning the governor's race against Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown (D) by promising to roll back tax increases and chart a new direction for the state.
South Carolina voters have sent Republican Tim Scott back to the U.S. Senate, making him the first black candidate to win a statewide race since just after the Civil War.
Marijuana legalization passed easily at the polls in the District on Tuesday, putting the city at the vanguard of a nationwide movement that also saw Oregon and Alaska consider pro-pot initiatives on Election Day.
As voters cast their final verdict on President Obama Tuesday, Democratic hope has changed to frustration.
Before the election results are in, and keeping in mind that there may be some unpleasant surprises for one party or the other -- or both -- it's possible to assess how the Democratic Party has fared under the leadership of President Obama. To summarize the verdict: not so well.
The US Supreme Court on Monday seemed divided on the question of whether it is constitutional to register "Israel" as the birthplace of Jerusalem-born Americans.
A record number of rogue Christian pastors are endorsing candidates from the pulpit this election cycle, using Sunday sermons to defiantly flout tax rules.
Claiming new momentum 48 hours before polls open across America, Republicans on Sunday assailed President Barack Obama in a final weekend push to motivate voters as Democrats deployed their biggest stars to help preserve an endangered Senate majority.
Regardless of the outcomes of Tuesday's midterm elections, President Obama is preparing to spring several major decisions on the public that he has postponed because of his concern about political backlash.
Snow to start November in South Carolina? Basically unheard of. Until today. The snow is not just the mountains either. An extremely unusual cold pocket of air has brought record early-season snow to low-elevation spots like Columbia, South Carolina. In the Smoky Mountains, and surrounding parts of the Appalachians, measurements well past one foot have been recorded.
After 214 days in a Mexican prison, Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi returned home to Florida Saturday, having been freed Friday night after a strong diplomatic push appeared to help convince a judge to release the former Marine on humanitarian grounds.
State-level K-12 education spending has fallen dramatically in many states since 2008. In that time, 29 states cut per pupil spending, shifting the burden of financing education to local school districts and, in many instances, forcing schools to cut costs and even teachers.
After eight years in the proverbial wilderness, Republicans are feeling confident about their chances of reclaiming the Senate majority in next week's elections -- as the two-year, bare-knuckle battle boils down to about 10 key races in the final days.
Former Guantanamo Bay detainees may have joined up with Islamic State forces (ISIS) or other extremist groups within the Syrian border, according to senior Defense Department and intelligence officials.
Hackers thought to be working for the Russian government breached the unclassified White House computer networks in recent weeks, sources said, resulting in temporary disruptions to some services while cybersecurity teams worked to contain the intrusion.
In a rare public accounting of its mass surveillance program, the United States Postal Service reported that it approved nearly 50,000 requests last year from law enforcement agencies and its own internal inspection unit to secretly monitor the mail of Americans for use in criminal and national security investigations.
The mayor of Houston announced Wednesday that the city will withdraw subpoenas of sermons from five pastors who publicly opposed an ordinance banning discrimination against gay and transgender residents, The Houston Chronicle reports.
First, the mayor of Houston flagrantly violated clergy's First Amendment rights, when she subpoenaed sermons, and she still refuses to rescind her mandate. And now California government officials are forcing churches and other faith-based organizations to fund abortions.
The Affordable Care Act was supposed to make health care more affordable, but a newly released study of insurance policies before and after Obamacare shows that average premiums have skyrocketed, for some groups by as much as 78 percent.
Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen and other central bank officials are likely to end their large-scale bond-buying program this week, while simultaneously promising lower interest rates for longer to stimulate the economy.
The State Department has quietly made plans to bring Ebola-infected doctors and medical aides to the U.S. for treatment, according to an internal department document that argued the only way to get other countries to send medical teams to West Africa is to promise that the U.S. will be the world's medical backstop.
The FBI in Seattle created a fake news story on a bogus Seattle Times web page to plant software in the computer of a suspect in a series of bomb threats to Lacey’s Timberline High School in 2007, according to documents obtained by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in San Francisco.
The 2010 BP oil spill left an oily "bathtub ring" on the sea floor roughly the size of Rhode Island, according to a new study.
A staggering number of Americans residing abroad are tempted to give up their U.S. passports in the wake of tougher asset-disclosure rules under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), according to a new survey.
The Internal Revenue Service has been seizing bank accounts belonging to small businesses and individuals who regularly made deposits of less than $10,000, but broke no laws. And the government is refusing to return all the money taken.
Jackie Hill-Perry considers herself not merely an agent of change, but its embodiment as well. A Christian spoken-word poet from Chicago, Ms. Hill-Perry professes to be a former lesbian -- a change she ascribes to God.
At some point, a compendium of condemnations against the Obama administration's record of media transparency (actually, opacity) must be assembled. Notable quotations in this vein come from former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson, who said, "It is the most secretive White House that I have ever been involved in covering"; New York Times reporter James Risen, who said, "I think Obama hates the press"; and CBS News's Bob Schieffer, who said, "This administration exercises more control than George W. Bush's did, and his before that."
The FBI has identified an employee of a federal contracting firm suspected of being the so-called "second leaker" who turned over sensitive documents about the U.S. government's terrorist watch list to a journalist closely associated with ex-NSA contractor Edward Snowden, according to law enforcement and intelligence sources who have been briefed on the case.
For almost 40 years, Carole Hinders has dished out Mexican specialties at her modest cash-only restaurant. For just as long, she deposited the earnings at a small bank branch a block away -- until last year, when two tax agents knocked on her door and informed her that they had seized her checking account, almost $33,000.
White House officials are pushing Govs. Cuomo and Chris Christie to dial down their mandatory quarantine rules and let the feds decide how to keep the deadly Ebola virus from spreading in the United States, sources told The Post on Sunday.
Army Major General Darryl A. Williams, commander of U.S. Army Africa, and approximately 10 other personnel are now in "controlled monitoring" in Italy after returning there from West Africa over the weekend, according to multiple U.S. military officials.
The lawyer for a nurse in a 21-day mandatory quarantine in a New Jersey hospital after she returned from treating Ebola patients in Africa said Sunday he is planning to file a federal suit to get her released.
Former solicitor general Theodore Olson, the Republican lawyer who argued Bush v. Gore and the challenge to California's Proposition 8, says the Supreme Court through action and inaction this month passed "the point of no return" on same-sex marriage.
Enough non-citizens illegally vote in U.S. elections to potentially decide close races, a new study suggests.
Obama plans a number of radical moves later this year when the administration believes the media, and the public, are paying less attention. This includes a forced transformation of our neighborhoods, a huge influx of immigrants and billions of dollars in additional taxes.
Some parents in Massachusetts were angry when they learned students were being taught about Islam and the Muslim religion. "No religion should be taught at school. In their paper it says Allah is their only God. That's insulting to me as a Christian who believes in just Jesus only," said Anthony Giannino.
In a surprise move late Friday, a key Democrat on the Federal Election Commission called for burdensome new rules on Internet-based campaigning, prompting the Republican chairman to warn that Democrats want to regulate online political sites and even news media like the Drudge Report.
A hatchet-swinging psycho with Islamic militant leanings turned a busy Queens street corner into a scene of bloody chaos Thursday, chopping a rookie cop in the back of the head and slicing a second officer on the arm before two other officers shot him dead.
Al Qaeda spent less than $1 million on its signature 9/11 attack, but Islamic State has found an even more cost-effective way to strike on American soil - inspiring psychotic sympathizers to commit 'lone wolf' attacks that blur the line between random crime and terrorism, say experts.
America has lost its first soldier in its fight against Islamic State from non-combative wounds, the Pentagon announced on Friday night.
A 23-year-old man was arrested by the U.S. Secret Service after jumping over the White House fence today as authorities were on heightened alert after shootings at Canada's Parliament.
The White House said Wednesday it is "deeply concerned" by reports that Islamic State militants are advancing on the same Yazidi community in Iraq whose plight prompted the U.S. military to intervene two months ago in an attempt to save the religious minorities from "genocide."
President Obama used executive privilege to withhold the contents of more than 20 emails sent between Attorney General Eric Holder, his wife and his mother that a conservative watchdog group sought in connection with the federal government's botched "Fast and Furious" gun-running operation.
Early voting in Illinois got off to a rocky start Monday, as votes being cast for Republican candidates were transformed into votes for Democrats.
Official documents on slain 18-year-old Michael Brown have reportedly revealed that he was shot in the hand at close range and had marijuana in his system when he was killed by a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer.
Health officials rolled out plans to monitor people arriving in the U.S. from West Africa for Ebola for 21 days, and President Barack Obama said he's now "cautiously more optimistic" the U.S. can contain the virus.
This is the new normal in Ferguson: Protests, day and night, for more than 70 days now.
An Army rapid deployment force will practice securing the Pentagon's strategic missile defenses base in Alaska this week as part of annual exercises involving both conventional and nuclear forces.
Leon Rodriguez, the new head of Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), recalled how he was put on the "wait list" and eventually denied admission to Georgetown Law School, where he spoke Tuesday.
Dozens of suspected Nazi war criminals and SS guards collected millions of dollars in U.S. Social Security benefits after being forced out of the United States, an Associated Press investigation has found.
Health officials released new guidelines Monday for how health workers should gear up to treat Ebola patients.
The Defense Department said Sunday that it is preparing a quick-response medical team to help health-care professionals should the Ebola virus spread in the United States.
Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys filed a federal lawsuit and a motion for a temporary restraining order Friday to stop officials in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, from forcing two ordained Christian ministers to perform wedding ceremonies for same-sex couples.
Heading into the final weeks of the midterm campaign, the political landscape continues to tilt in favor of the Republican Party, with President Obama's overall approval rating at the lowest level of his presidency and GOP voters signaling greater likelihood than Democrats that they will cast ballots, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.
Barriers to gay marriage fell in Arizona, Alaska and Wyoming on Friday following a series of federal court actions in the latest in a series of legal victories for supporters of same-sex matrimony in America.
The Supreme Court has been unusually busy in recent weeks redefining state election laws across the country, with justices poised again to weigh in on how voters cast their ballots ahead of next month's mid-term elections.
Critics called Thursday on Houston Mayor Annise Parker to withdraw subpoenas for church sermons issued as part of a lawsuit over a transgender rights ordinance, while city officials attempted to downplay the outcry as overblown.
President Barack Obama on Thursday authorized the Pentagon to call up military reservists to help fight the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
Infectious disease experts say school officials in Ohio and Texas overreacted when they canceled classes Thursday in fear of Ebola.
Four Southern Oregon University students claim university officials threatened to call the police and take disciplinary action against them last week after they passed out free copies of the U.S. Constitution and asked other students to sign a petition to end limitations on areas where students can demonstrate.
Two large Cleveland hospital systems say some of their nurses and other employees were on a flight from Dallas with a Texas nurse days before she was diagnosed with Ebola.
Those planning to purchase health insurance on the Obamacare exchange will soon find out how much rates have increased -- after the Nov. 4 election.
The number of American adults who have never been married has hit an all-time high. The latest date from 2012 shows one in 5 adults over the age of 25 fell into that category.
The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday blocked key parts of a 2013 law in Texas that had closed all but eight facilities providing abortions in America's second most-populous state.
The city of Houston has issued subpoenas demanding a group of pastors turn over any sermons dealing with homosexuality, gender identity or Annise Parker, the city's first openly lesbian mayor. And those ministers who fail to comply could be held in contempt of court.
The Rev. Franklin Graham said Monday that "activist judges" are to blame in the legalization of gay marriage.
The U.S. military plans to land its secretive X-37B robotic space plane in California on Tuesday, ending a classified 22-month mission, officials said.
A powerful storm has swept across the southern US, killing at least two people and injuring several others.
Federal budget austerity slowed the development of vaccines and therapies for the deadly Ebola virus that has ravaged West Africa, killed one man in Dallas and infected a health-care worker in Texas, according to the top National Institutes of Health official.
Boston officials are stepping up efforts to spot Ebola cases after the Hub area was hit by its first scare yesterday, when a man who recently visited Liberia was quarantined after walking into a Braintree medical clinic complaining of head and muscle aches.
A federal appeals court says Idaho's ban on same-sex marriage will end Wednesday morning.
U.S. and local health officials want to set up dedicated hospitals in each state for Ebola patients, part of a new emphasis on safety for health-care workers after a nurse caring for an infected patient in Dallas tested positive for the virus.
About 70 staff members at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital were involved in the care of Thomas Eric Duncan after he was hospitalized, including a nurse now being treated for the same Ebola virus that killed the Liberian man who was visiting Dallas, according to medical records his family provided to The Associated Press.
Three fault segments running beneath Northern California and its roughly 15 million people are overdue for a major earthquake, including one section that lies near the dams and canals that supply much of the state's water, according to a geological study published Monday.
Say "drought" and Americans are likely to think California, but the Golden State is hardly alone when looking across the Western Hemisphere: A dry spell has killed cattle and wiped out crops in Central America, parts of Colombia have seen rioting over scarce water, and southern Brazil is facing its worst dry spell in 50 years.
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria terrorists may use "carriers" to spread the Ebola virus as part of a low-tech biological terror tactic, according to national security and health experts.
A Michigan toddler has died of enterovirus D68, another reminder of the deadly potential of a disease that has infected hundreds nationwide in two months.
Thousands gathered Saturday for a second day of organized rallies and marches protesting Michael Brown's death and other fatal police shootings in the St. Louis area and nationwide.
An undetermined "breach in protocol" led a Dallas health care worker to be infected with the Ebola virus, and additional cases could be discovered in the coming days, a top federal health official said.
The United States was said to have detected Islamic State of Iraq and Levant at the border with Mexico.
Public health is the purview of the states, and as the nation anticipates more Ebola cases, some experts say the way the United States handles public health is not up to the challenge.
The US-led air attacks launched against Islamic State (also known as Isis) on 8 August in Iraq and 23 September in Syria have not worked. President Obama's plan to "degrade and destroy" Islamic State has not even begun to achieve success. In both Syria and Iraq, Isis is expanding its control rather than contracting.
Justice Anthony Kennedy mistakenly blocked the start of same-sex marriage in Nevada Wednesday in an order he later corrected, court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg confirmed Thursday to the Associated Press.
Enterovirus D68 has killed five U.S. children and infected hundreds more in the past month and a half, doctors confirm, and some believe there may be a connection between the sudden outbreak and the throngs of unaccompanied, illegal-alien children now being housed across the country.
Several US financial institutions were targeted by the same computer hackers who breached the systems of JPMorgan Chase earlier this year, sources familiar with the matter said Wednesday.
Federal Reserve officials want to tie an interest-rate rise to U.S. economic progress, but the minutes of their last policy meeting show they are struggling with how to come to grips with the dual threats of a stronger dollar and a global slowdown.
A top U.S. general admitted that a potential Ebola outbreak in Central America is a real threat to the United States and a scenario which could result in a mass migration across the U.S./Mexico border, as thousands would attempt to flee the deadly virus.
Sexually transmitted diseases are one major group of diseases that make for ongoing hidden epidemics: In the United States alone, there are nearly 20 million cases of new sexually transmitted infections yearly, from just eight viruses and bacteria, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, Thomas Eric Duncan, died on Wednesday morning at a Dallas hospital, a hospital spokesman said.
A new Gallup poll suggests voter turnout will be low in November, with higher Republican turnout predicted.
A Republican congressman claimed Tuesday that "at least 10" Islamic State "fighters" have been caught trying to cross the U.S.-Mexico border into Texas, though an administration official denied it.
Justice Anthony M. Kennedy on Wednesday afternoon lifted a stay on allowing same-sex marriages to begin in Nevada, separating that state from Idaho, which received a temporary reprieve.
The Supreme Court refused to get involved in the national debate over same-sex marriage Monday, leaving intact lower court rulings that will legalize the practice in 11 additional states.
Add Nevada and Idaho to the rapidly growing list of states to have their same-sex marriage bans tossed out in definitive fashion.
The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear appeals from five states wanting to ban same-sex marriage.
President Obama on Monday said that federal officials would heighten screening of travelers coming to the United States, responding to growing calls to do more to limit the spread of the Ebola virus, but not meeting demands to put in place a travel ban from West Africa.
An al-Qaida cell in Syria that was targeted in American military airstrikes last month could still be working on a plan to attack the United States or its allies and is "looking to do it very, very soon," the head of the FBI says.
The news about this summer's cyberattack on JPMorgan Chase continues to get worse: A number of other financial institutions were also hit by the same group, according to the New York Times.
Republicans remain favored to win Senate control in the upcoming midterm elections, a new poll says.
The 25th annual East of the River Revival starts Monday, offering four days of faith-based events for the young and old hoping to reconnect with their religion.
With the country's voters so evenly split, both Republicans and Democrats are increasingly turning attention to the rules for voting, hoping to gain an edge -- and their disputes will make their way to the Supreme Court in the term that begins Monday.
Sen. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Republican, said Sunday that U.S. service members need to go to Syria and Iraq because air strikes will not be enough to defeat the Islamic State.
With midterm elections less than five weeks away, congressional approval is in the single digits.
A Texas emergency room's mishandling of the country's first Ebola patient prompted the CDC to issue a nationwide alert to all hospitals updating them of how to appropriately respond to possible cases of the deadly disease.
A Dallas man who was in contact with the first person to be diagnosed with the Ebola virus in the U.S. said in an interview that the Liberian native had been weak and ill in an apartment after trying to seek help at a hospital days earlier.
Weeds are developing resistance to herbicides, because the modified seeds can tolerate greater use of certain herbicides and pesticides. And it's reportedly costing farmers $1 billion in lost crops.
As California heads into peak fire season -- in the worst drought in state history -- firefighters are already tapping into reserve funds.
America's ticket for divine judgment may have already been signed and sent off to the printer, but there's still time for God to cancel the order, according to a leading Bible teacher and author.
As the United States steps up its battle against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS), defense leaders on Capitol Hill are raising concerns about a looming shortage in the Tomahawk missile supply, a key offensive weapon that the Navy has deployed against militant strongholds in Syria and elsewhere.
More than 3.6 million people have lost unemployment insurance benefits through September, according to a new report from House Democrats who want to renew the insurance program that Congress let expire in December.
A mosquito-borne virus that can cause debilitating joint pain lasting for years has spread to the continental U.S. after infecting hundreds of thousands of people in the Caribbean and Central America.
A man with a gun that the Secret Service did not know about rode in an elevator with President Obama during his visit to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta on Sept. 16.
An unusual respiratory virus has sickened more than 400 children across the United States, and the emergence of sudden paralysis in some Colorado youths is sparking concern among doctors.
The Obama administration is initiating a program to give refugee status to some young people from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador in response to the influx of unaccompanied minors arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border.
Prosecutors today announced the filing of murder and assault charges against the Oklahoma man arrested last week for allegedly attacking two female coworkers, one of whom was beheaded by her assailant.
According to state officials, a dozen communities in Central and Northern California will run out of water in 60 days.
A prolonged legal battle between Gilbert, Ariz., and a small Presbyterian church over religious signs is headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, with oral arguments likely to start later this year.
A new chart from the minority side of the Senate Budget Committee shows a startling fact: Almost 1 in 4 Americans between the ages of 25-54 (or prime working years) are not working.
U.S. District Court Judge John D. Bates has denied a request from the Department of Justice to delay the release of a list of Operation Fast and Furious documents being protected under President Obama's assertion of executive privilege.
A small number of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. will have an opportunity to join the military for the first time in decades under a new Department of Defense policy unveiled Thursday.
Wildfires are nothing new in California. But in the third year of a historic drought, the tinder-dry western US state is battling near-record numbers of blazes.
After weeks of heavy criticism and calls for his ouster, the police chief of Ferguson, Missouri, issued a video apology on Thursday to the parents of Michael Brown, the black teenager shot to death by a white police officer last month.
Sales of new U.S. single-family homes surged in August and hit their highest level in more than six years, offering confirmation that the housing recovery remains on course.
Less than two months after President Barack Obama's administration called for repeal of the Congressional authorization for the 2002 Iraq war, he is formally citing the 12-year-old measure as a basis for newly expanded airstrikes against the Islamic State of Syria and the Levant.
A Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling could have wide implications that limit free speech rights in schools, according to the lawyer who defended students who wore the American flag to school.
Las Vegas schools are considering plans to teach children as young as 5 about masturbation and homosexuality.
The U.S. intelligence community has observed a "significant increase" in chatter among terrorist organizations as the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks nears.