UK Yahoo News

• Foodbanks stop thousands going without this Christmas

Foodbanks stop thousands going without this ChristmasWhile many will over-indulge during the festive period, more and more people are relying on foodbanks just to put food on the table.




• Half of young mothers skip meals for their children

Half of young mothers skip meals for their childrenAround 50% of young mothers go without meals in order to make sure their children have enough, a study has found. The Young Women's Trust survey found more than a quarter had to use a food bank to provide for their young ones. Most young mums said it would be easier to find work if they had access to cheaper childcare, jobs with flexible hours, part-time work and an employer sympathetic to pregnant women or mothers.




• Goodbye? Adele says she may never tour again

Goodbye? Adele says she may never tour againThe British singer told fans at a concert in Auckland that she was not good at touring - and even admitted she feels "vulnerable" on stage, according to the New Zealand Herald. Adele reportedly burst into tears as she described her latest tour as "the greatest accomplishment in her career" - and said it changed her life.




• Anti-terror barriers to protect Changing of the Guard at Windsor Castle

Anti-terror barriers to protect Changing of the Guard at Windsor CastleSecurity at Windsor Castle is being stepped up for Changing of the Guard in the wake of the Westminster terror attack. The changes are "proportionate and necessary" but there is "no specific threat to Windsor", Thames Valley Police have said. Assistant Chief Constable Dave Hardcastle said "recent events in Westminster clearly highlight the need for extra security measures to be introduced".




• £1 coin: Everything you need to know about the new pound

£1 coin: Everything you need to know about the new poundAs the Royal Mint introduces a new £1 coin to tackle forgeries, here are 10 things we know about the pound. 4. The design for the new pound coin includes a rose, a thistle, a leek and a shamrock to reflect the four parts of the UK. In the past there have been 25 different designs on the pound coin.




• UK debt charity says demand for help hits record high

UK debt charity says demand for help hits record highThe number of people seeking help from a leading British debt advice service hit a record high last year, reflecting a surge in borrowing by consumers and the financial strains on younger workers, the charity said on Tuesday. Last year 600,000 people sought advice from StepChange for debt problems, up 9 percent from 2015. StepChange also said the average amount of debt owed by its clients rose for the first time since the global financial crisis.




• Prisons watchdog condemns lack of action on rising female suicides

Prisons watchdog condemns lack of action on rising female suicidesA record 119 people killed themselves in prisons in England and Wales last year. The prisons and probation ombudsman has hit out at a “lack of concerted and sustained action” following a rise in suicides among female prisoners. Nigel Newcomen said lessons identified in a new review of cases had been highlighted previously by his office and other inquiries but had not been implemented.




• Children missing out on education at risk of abuse and exploitation

Children missing out on education at risk of abuse and exploitationThe National Children’s Bureau (NCB), a leading children’s charity, says problems such as bullying, special educational needs, neglect and domestic violence at home, can cause a child to disappear from school for months, even years. Anna Feuchtwang, the NCB chief executive, said: “These children are often living on the margins, disengaged with school and invisible to other services. The NCB is calling for more resources for schools and local authorities to help identify children at risk of dropping out and to help them to return.




• Ethnic minorities 'get tougher sentences due to distrust in courts'

Ethnic minorities 'get tougher sentences due to distrust in courts'Improvements should be made to increase trust in the courts among black and minority ethnic people, the report says. Black and minority-ethnic defendants may be given more severe sentences at magistrate and crown courts because they distrust the criminal justice system and are reluctant to plead guilty, according to a legal thinktank. While judges reduce punishments by up to a third if offenders plead guilty at the earliest opportunity, a report by the Centre for Justice Innovation (CJI) suggests that a belief that courts treat black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people unfairly prevents them from taking advantage of such reductions and reinforces unequal outcomes.




• Immigration levels will sometimes rise after Brexit, says David Davis

Immigration levels will sometimes rise after Brexit, says David DavisImmigration levels will not necessarily come down consistently after Britain leaves the European Union, the Brexit secretary has indicated. Concerns over the net migration level were thought to be central to many people’s decision to vote in favour of Brexit last year, with many wanting to see the numbers cut drastically. The former Ukip leader Nigel Farage, for example, repeatedly said he would support cutting immigration numbers, even if doing so harmed Britain’s economy.




• On the eve of Brexit, Qatar pledges over $6 billion in investment in Britain

On the eve of Brexit, Qatar pledges over $6 billion in investment in BritainBy Tom Finn and Kylie MacLellan LONDON (Reuters) - Qatar pledged 5 billion pounds ($6.3 billion) of investment in Britain on Monday in a show of support for the world's fifth-largest economy just two days before Prime Minister Theresa May triggers formal Brexit talks. The wealthy Gulf state has 40 billion pounds of investments in the United Kingdom, including high-profile London landmarks like the Shard skyscraper, Harrods department store, The Savoy hotel and a stake in the Canary Wharf financial district. While the June 23 referendum vote to leave the European Union took many investors and chief executives by surprise, Qatar's top financial players used an investment conference in London to pledge support for Brexit Britain.




• Westminster killer Khalid Masood's mother: 'I have shed many tears for victims'

Westminster killer Khalid Masood's mother: 'I have shed many tears for victims'The mother of Westminster killer Khalid Masood says she has cried for the victims of the "horrendous" attack. Masood killed four people, including a police officer, during his 82-second rampage in central London last Wednesday. Police have said there was "no evidence" he had links with Islamic State or al Qaeda but was "clearly" interested in jihad.




• More than 400 former jihadi fighters back in Britain, say security sources

More than 400 former jihadi fighters back in Britain, say security sourcesUK authorities are facing an increased terror threat from battle-hardened fighters returning from Mosul and other conflict zones in Iraq and Syria. Security sources have told Sky News more than 400 former fighters are now believed to be back in Britain. The authorities believe there is a growing risk the UK could suffer the kind of mass gun and bomb attacks seen in France and Belgium recently, as many returning fighters will have been trained in the use of weapons and the construction of improvised explosive devices.




• Correction: Penn State-Abuse story

Correction: Penn State-Abuse storyHARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — In some versions of a March 24 story about the criminal conviction of former Penn State University president Graham Spanier, The Associated Press erroneously reported the length of retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's sentence. It was for 30 to 60 years, not 10 to 30 years.




• Will Jeremy Corbyn still be Labour leader in 2020?

Will Jeremy Corbyn still be Labour leader in 2020?Jeremy Corbyn seems unimpressed as he is repeatedly asked if he will be Labour leader in 2020.




• Corbyn 'almost as unpopular as Trump' in Britain, according to poll

Corbyn 'almost as unpopular as Trump' in Britain, according to pollJeremy Corbyn is almost as unpopular as Donald Trump among the British public, according to pollsters GfK. The majority of Britons think both men are doing a bad job, with 58% disapproving of the performance of Mr Corbyn as leader of the opposition and 60% disapproving of Mr Trump as US President. Just 17% approve of Mr Corbyn's performance, while 18% approve of Mr Trump, the poll found.




• Sturgeon says May’s Brexit timescale matches referendum plan

Sturgeon says May’s Brexit timescale matches referendum planNicola Sturgeon has said there is no longer any rational case against a second Scottish independence referendum after Theresa May told her that the full Brexit deal would be known within 18 months. The first minister said May’s disclosure, during a meeting in Glasgow, closely matched the Scottish government’s timescale for calling a fresh referendum between autumn 2018 and spring 2019. She said the prime minister was clear that the detailed terms of the UK’s divorce from the EU and the terms of its new free trade and immigration deal with the EU would be spelled out by autumn 2018.




• Settle Brexit bill quickly to boost chance of free trade deal, say pro-EU Tories

Settle Brexit bill quickly to boost chance of free trade deal, say pro-EU ToriesTheresa May is facing conflicting calls over the Brexit bill from within the Conservative party. Theresa May will be urged by pro-EU Conservatives to reach a quick deal over the divorce bill from Brussels in order to maximise the chances of reaching a free trade deal within the tight deadline for Brexit talks. As the prime minister prepares to trigger article 50, the formal process for leaving the EU, on Wednesday, rebel Tories who seek the closest possible relationship with the EU are preparing to offer May political cover for settling what they see as Britain’s debts to Brussels.




• London attacker interested in jihad but no evidence of IS link - police

London attacker interested in jihad but no evidence of IS link - policeBritish police said on Monday they had found no evidence that Khalid Masood, who killed four people in an attack on Britain's parliament last week, had any association with Islamic State or Al Qaeda, but he was clearly interested in jihad. Masood drove a car through a crowd of pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, killing three and injuring about 50, then ran through the gates of parliament and fatally stabbed a police officer, before he was shot dead by police. Neil Basu, senior national coordinator for UK counter-terrorism policing, said there was no evidence that Masood had been radicalised in prison in 2003 and it was pure speculation to suggest that had happened.




• New GCSEs: 'Only two pupils in England will get all top marks'

New GCSEs: 'Only two pupils in England will get all top marks'The chief analyst at the Department for Education (DfE) has estimated that just two pupils in England are likely to get all top grades in the new GCSEs being phased in from this summer. In recent years, parents, pupils and teachers have become accustomed to a sizeable number of the highest-achieving students in the most academically successful schools gaining all straight A*s in their GCSE examinations.




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