State supreme court will hear case of Christian artists worried they'll face jail time if they don't promote same-sex marriage

Wednesday, November 21, 2018 | Tag Cloud Tags: , , , , , ,

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(Worthy News) - On Tuesday, the Arizona Supreme Court agreed to hear another case that shares eerie similarities with the recent Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission Supreme Court case. This time, instead of cake, the court will hear about two artists who run a shop called Brush and Nib Studio. Like Jack Phillips, the two women, Joanna Duka and Breanna Koski, are devout Christians. While they are happy to hand-paint artwork for their customers, particularly for weddings, they do not wish to convey messages that violate their religious beliefs. A sweeping law in Phoenix would mean the artists could face fines and jail time if the artists refuse to design messages with with they disagree.

According to Phoenix City Code 18-4(B)(1)-(3), the ordinance prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or disability. Adopted in 2013, it applies to businesses offering services to the general public. Unlike with Jack Phillips, there has not been a specific instance where the owners of Brush and Nib were asked to create artwork with which they did not agree. However, Alliance Defending Freedom, which represents the artists, believes “Phoenix interprets its ordinance in a way that forces the two artists to use their artistic talents to celebrate and promote same-sex marriage in violation of their beliefs.” The “law threatens up to six months in jail, $2,500 in fines, and three years of probation for each day that there is a violation.” [ Source: Washington Examiner (Read More...) ]

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