Religious liberty battles may take center stage in Supreme Court's new term

Monday, September 4, 2017 | Tag Cloud Tags: , , , , ,

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Supreme Court, Washington D.C.

(Worthy News) - A flurry of religious liberty challenges headed toward the Supreme Court in its upcoming term could leave a lasting mark on American law for years to come.

The Supreme Court's decision to grant a high-profile case involving a Colorado baker's refusal to design and make a cake celebrating a same-sex marriage figures to be a blockbuster. The court has not yet scheduled oral arguments for Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which makes it increasingly likely that the case could be heard in December.

Meanwhile, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty has asked the court to hear that case 'in tandem' with a similar dispute arriving from Washington state.

Eric C. Rassbach, a Becket Fund attorney, filed a petition urging the Supreme Court to hear the cake-baker case back-to-back with Arlene's Flowers v. State of Washington given the "wave of religious vendor litigation around the country." The Arlene's Flowers case involves Barronelle Stutzman's refusal to design floral arrangements for a same-sex ceremony of a longtime customer of her flower shop. [ Source (Read More...) ]

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